Tuesday, 02 August 2022 00:00

Stress fractures of the foot, considered to be overuse injuries, are cracked bones that result from repetitive impact. They are common to runners, especially those whose footwear does not support the foot sufficiently. Women with osteoporosis are also prone to getting stress fractures. A podiatrist can diagnose stress fractures, starting with a medical history of your past injuries, along with a review of your eating habits, exercise regime, and daily activities. X-rays may not be able to detect the hairline fractures until a month or so following the injury, so other types of imaging tests may be necessary. A bone scan may be conducted, calling for a dose of radioactive material given intravenously. However, the results may not be conclusive, because many types of bone problems look alike. An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) test may be administered. This process uses radio waves and a strong magnetic field that create detailed images of the bones. The MRI is considered to be the best indicator of stress fractures, because it shows fractures sooner than an X-ray can, and it also differentiates between bone and soft tissue injuries. An ultrasound test or a CT scan (computed tomography) also can be used to diagnose stress fractures. If you believe the pain in your feet is being caused by a stress fracture, please consult a podiatrist for diagnosis and treatment.


 

Stress fractures occur when there is a tiny crack within a bone. To learn more, contact one of our podiatrists from Cleveland Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain free and on your feet.

How Are They Caused?

Stress fractures are the result of repetitive force being placed on the bone. Since the lower leg and feet often carry most of the body’s weight, stress fractures are likely to occur in these areas. If you rush into a new exercise, you are more likely to develop a stress fracture since you are starting too much, too soon.  Pain resulting from stress fractures may go unnoticed at first, however it may start to worsen over time.

Risk Factors

  • Gender – They are more commonly found in women compared to men.
  • Foot Problems – People with unusual arches in their feet are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Certain Sports – Dancers, gymnasts, tennis players, runners, and basketball players are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Lack of Nutrients – A lack of vitamin D and calcium may weaken the bones and make you more prone to stress fractures
  • Weak Bones – Osteoporosis can weaken the bones therefore resulting in stress fractures

Stress fractures do not always heal properly, so it is important that you seek help from a podiatrist if you suspect you may have one. Ignoring your stress fracture may cause it to worsen, and you may develop chronic pain as well as additional fractures.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Cleveland, Independence, and Kent, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 26 July 2022 00:00

For many, summertime means time to get out and get active. Before trying a new sport or physical activity, be sure to properly stretch and gradually increase intensity to prevent injuries.

If you need treatment for an injury or would like to learn about injury prevention, schedule an appointment.

Tuesday, 26 July 2022 00:00

A bump on the bottom of the foot may be indicative of a foot condition known as plantar fibromatosis. This ailment develops on the plantar fascia which is the band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot. Its function is to connect the heel to the toes, in addition to supporting the arch. A plantar fibroma can form when nodules grow in the plantar fascia, and can cause pain and discomfort. Research has shown there is no cure for this condition, and existing patients often look to manage the pain. This can be done by performing specific foot stretches that can help to strengthen the foot. A calf stretch is effective in relieving pain from the plantar fascia, and this is done by standing on a step, and lowering the heel until a gentle stretch is felt. Patients may find that performing a marble pick up is helpful in strengthening the arch. This is a simple stretch, and may take some practice to perfect it. This is done by placing several marbles on the floor next to a towel, and picking one marble up at a time with your foot. If you would like more information about how to relieve pain from a plantar fibroma, please consult with a podiatrist. 

 

A plantar fibroma may disrupt your daily activities. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of Cleveland Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Plantar Fibroma

A plantar fibroma is a fibrous knot in the arch of the foot. It is embedded in the plantar fascia which is a band of tissue that extends from the heel to the toes along the bottom of the foot. There can be multiple plantar fibromas in the feet at the same time. There are no known causes for this condition. If you have a plantar fibroma, there will be a bump in the arch of your foot that cannot be missed. Any associated pain is most often due to a shoe rubbing against the nodule. Non-surgical options, such as steroid injections, physical therapy, and orthotics should be tried first. Surgery is a last resort and is the only thing that will remove a plantar fibroma entirely. Consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and to determine the treatment regimen that is right for you.

What Causes a Plantar Fibroma?

While there are no specific causes identified, a plantar fibroma can possibly come from genetic predisposition or the formation of scar tissue that forms from healing the tears in the plantar fascia.

What Are the Symptoms of a Plantar Fibroma?

There will be a noticeable lump in the arch of the foot that may or may not cause pain. If pain is felt, it is typically because a shoe is rubbing up against the lump or when walking or standing barefoot.

Treatment and Prevention

A plantar fibroma will not disappear without treatment, but it can get smaller and be a non-issue. If pain persists, a podiatrist examines the foot and when the arch of the foot is pressed, pain can be felt down to the toes. An MRI or biopsy might be performed to help diagnose or evaluate the plantar fibroma. The following non-surgical options are generally enough to reduce the size and pain of these nodules:

  • Steroid injections
  • Orthotics
  • Physical therapy to help apply anti-inflammatory creams on the bump 

Surgery is considered if the mass increases in size and the patient continues to feel pain after non-surgical methods are tried.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Cleveland, Independence, and Kent, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 19 July 2022 00:00

A congenital condition that affects the peripheral nervous system is called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. It occurs as a baby’s DNA begins to develop in the womb, and for that reason is also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. Charcot-Marie-Tooth is often detected during puberty, causing muscle weakness and difficulty walking. Later on it can also affect the arms and hands. Hammertoes and high arches are further signs of the disease. A child will notice a difficulty in running, a tendency to trip or fall, and a problem lifting the foot at the ankle. Falling may cause injuries to other body parts, making normal daily activities more problematic. If a child begins to drag their feet, has trouble going up and down steps, or marches instead of walking, it is a good idea to consult a podiatrist for an exam and diagnosis. Treatment may include braces to support the foot and certain medications. In some cases, surgery may become an option.


 

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of Cleveland Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Cleveland, Independence, and Kent, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Congenital Foot Problems

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